Gewalt

2004

Published by:
Loushy Fine Art and Editions, Tel Aviv, Israel.

Paperback

http://www.loushy.com/exhb.aspx

Volume Contributors:
Suhail Malik (Editor) Reza Aramesh, Diann Bauer, Amanda Beech, Aya Ben Ron, Candice Breitz, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Nigel Cooke, David Falconer, Gunther Herbst.
Order, security, peace: these are the universally presumed requirements and aspirations of social life. Violence is the enemy and destruction of all of these. As such, it is to be condemned. Violence is the overturning and disregard of order and authority, of logic, of people, of bodies, of property, of security, of peace, of life. Violence is repulsive. If there is violence it is to be carefully contained, repudiated and punished – individually, socially – through actions and law.
At every level, what is violent is without question also illegitimate. With one historical exception: violence is only legitimate when it is carried out by authorities, which, in modern times, is to say in the name of the State. Authority, especially the authority of the State,
protects its people from violence, internally (its laws, the police, its right to punish and even execute violaters) and externally (its armies, protecting its peace and security). As is only too well known, this theory continues to underpin the justification of many actions on the international stage.
Yet… the violence of the State is obviously no guarantee of peace and security today. Arguably, it even encourages and carries out a multiplicity of violences that it is meant to protect its people from (the degradation of the distinction between the military and civilian realms in the fight against terrorism, to take a contemporary example)…
(Suhail Malik)